Author Topic: Protecting your search history  (Read 146 times)

Offline yankeedoodle

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Protecting your search history
« on: April 16, 2017, 08:51:04 AM »
Very interesting and informative 23-minute audio from Radio New Zealand International. 
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/saturday/audio/201840498/dan-schultz-protecting-your-search-history

Recently, the US House of Representatives voted to allow internet service providers sell browsing data on the open market, angering many. 

One who decided he would protest the move was 30-year-old programmer Dan Schultz, who lives north of Philadelphia.

Schultz created the website Internet Noise, which auto-opens tabs based on random Google searches and makes it impossible for IPs to accurately profile internet users.

He envisages users running the application while sleeping, scrambling their internet histories en masse.
https://slifty.github.io/internet_noise/index.html



Offline yankeedoodle

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Re: Protecting your search history
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2017, 11:50:49 AM »
Full disclosure: Google Hire could allow employers to see your entire browsing history   
https://www.rt.com/viral/385064-google-hire-browsing-history/

Anxious jobseekers could have another reason to sweat over interviews and reference checks. Google’s latest creation aimed at the recruitment market could give bosses the ability to do full, uncensored background checks.

Google Hire, the Internet giant’s new recruitment tool that allows employers to manage job applications, has sparked fears that recruiters could access applicants’ entire browsing history.

Touted as a recruitment tool, like Linkedin, Google Hire would allow employers to place job ads and manage applications through the product.

The product’s sign-in page has an option to connect through a personal Google account, which has prompted fears that employers could be able to access your search history and Youtube subscriptions.

Google, however, hasn’t given much away about the new venture, so it is unclear exactly what employers will be able to search for when looking for potential hires.

The ‘Applicant-Tracking System’ (ATS) that Google uses to manage the tracking for its own job applicants has now been repurposed to create a new revenue stream for the company.